RAMRODS

Second Infantry Regiment
 
 
 


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Terry Sage
Reply with quote  #1 
Different posts have referred to happenings at Bandit Hill . How many of us who were at Bandit Hill actually follow this web site?

Terry Sage. B co 2/2. track 213
Curtis Parker
Reply with quote  #2 
Terry,I follows all post concerning Bandit Hill. I think that there are not many Daring Bravo Bandits still around from Bandit Hill!!!!


Curtis Parker
B 2/2 Inf,3rd Plt, Track B231
9 Dec 1967-10 Dec 1968
John Kerins
Reply with quote  #3 
I was there for the whole show.

Spent probably two or three minutes pinned down behind the baseplate in the track. Our battery had been disconnected by one of the guys and he never told anyone else. The ramp wouldn't close and mortars were landing right behind the track with shrapnel wising all over inside and bouncing around. Seemed like a life time.

The only time in Nam when I was scared, really, really scared. Terrified and I froze couched down behind the baseplate. I swear to God I'd still be hiding behind it had not Don Tilley, disoriented came into my track 242, thinking it was 243. I asked him if he knew any prayers? Really. He answered and I quote, "Preacher Red says we Southern Baptists don't have to pray. Just being Southern Baptists we get to heaven! Now John, lets do something!" That's all it took. He and I SLAMMED the ramp shut and went to work.

Learned one thing that night. If you hide, it can be awfully tough to get back up. Never made that mistake again.
ken
Reply with quote  #4 
Guys was a Firebase called Holiday Inn east of Bandit Hill. And also was  Claymore Corners just west of Bandit Hill. 
ken
Curtis Parker
Reply with quote  #5 
John there is nothing wrong about being scared....We all were scared everytime we left the NDP/Thunders to go on S&D's,LP/OP,Ambush Patrols etc.Over coming that fear to continue doing your job is what ist important whether at Bandit Hill or any other place of Battle...Hey feel good about yourself..I know that that ramp was heavy and that God was watching over You that night and did not need You in heaven that night...On 3 April 1968 I also prayed after we ran Out of ammo when the NVA hit us again as withdrew out of the jungle..I thought that B 2/2 was doomed, later at the Reunion in Pigeon Forge I learned that the 1st Plt had Killed the NVA who had hit us again,I do believe in prayed. I am Happy that you survived the Battle at Bandit Hill.



Curtis Parker
B 2/2 Inf,3rd Plt, Track B231
9 Dec 1967-10 Dec 1968
John Kerins
Reply with quote  #6 
Curtis,

I'm glad I survived too. And that guys like you, Norm, and so many others made it back to all become BROthers today!
 
But after 14 April 68 when I saw that guy who was blown in half, sweep south on Highway 13 just outside Thunder I, I shut down. No fear, no emotion! Heading into contact I used to get very calm. As long as I could respond as we were trained to, no probleemo! When I hit behind that baseplate I could do nothing, no longer respond. That when I was terrified! Thank God Tilley snapped me out of it. Knew better to allow myself to EVER get in a similar situation. 

My emotions were turned off 14 Apr 68. Then I felt something on 13 Oct. That was abject terror. Have buried my emotions pretty deeply ever since. That's my PTSD. No nightmares, but constant memories. While I see and hear battle and screams in my dreams, no emotion. Councilor told me, "If you felt nothing when those things happened, why would you feel anything now?" Only emotion was a few minutes at Bandit Hill. Didn't feel good so it reinforced my 'protective isolation', which I still use. Or so I'm told by the "experts"
BCC
Reply with quote  #7 
Here is a list of FSB and coordinates

http://home.usaa.net/~dracalpha/2nd_Infantry/FSB.html
Curtis Parker
Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks BCC,now do you have a map to so we can see the locations of the coordinances that you furnished to us,ha,ha,ha......Roger good job...It always amazes me what we all have saved from Vietnam.


John thanks for being able to share your innner deep private emotions with us your Brothers.We all carry that Elephant inside of US..Some of those Elephant are more heavier to carry than others and some visit US more often than others...Happy mine have not turned pink so far....I think that the daily knowledge that death was Just around the Corner for 350+days in Vietnam kept US all scared and branded US for Life,but we were soldier and did what we were trained to do while being scared and to experience what was to come and did our best to survive fighting and suffering Side by Side together as a Combat unit in war that is not a pretty sight to witness and engage in. Only a fool is not scared in war for the fool is not Brave,but a scared man is Brave knowing what the danger is and still does what is required and after all is Said and done is still scared to do it again and again until it is over!!!

John after what You witnessed on 14 April 1968 You realized the value of Life and desired the will to survive in your own Personal was.

Curtis Parker
B 2/2 Inf,3rd Plt, Track B 231
9 Dec 1967-10 Dec 1968
Terry Sage
Reply with quote  #9 
John, How many tracks were at Bandit Hill on Oct 13 ? With 3rd platoon and the 2 tracks still left running from the 1st platoon out of the NDP that would have left a lot of perimeter open.

Terry Sage
John Kerins
Reply with quote  #10 
Terry,

Not absolutely clear on the number of tracks but as best I recall

3 from the 4th plt (41 had been DXed by a mine and not yet replaced)
4 from the 2nd plt
the commo track used as command by XO Lt Lloyd

Other than those I believe the medic and mechanics tracks were there. My guess is ten tracks and 55-60 or so troops.

We had reset the perimeter after basically cutting the NDP in half. The road that ran through the center of the NDP became the north side perimeter. 4th plt and I believe the mechanics were manning that section. 

 

Richard Brown
Reply with quote  #11 
Terry i was 3rd platoon leader at that time and we tried very hard to get back there. We had to wait for the CO and 1st platoon to catch up with us as we waited by the roads edge. That is when two brave soldiers volunteered to run the road.


Richard Brown
B & HHC 2/2
Curtis Parker
Reply with quote  #12 
Thanks Richard for the comment...Roger,Over and Out!!!!!!and to my driver Ken.

Curtis Parker
B 2/2 Inf,3rd Plt, Track B231
9 Dec 1967-10 Dec 1968
Curtis Parker
Reply with quote  #13 
John,it is ironic that reading my hand written storyof 3 April 1968 Bravo 2/2 Inf,I was back in Lai Khe in the orderly rooms monitoring the radio concerning the event before departing for R&R to Bangkok on 14 April 1968 the day that you experience the terrible dramatic event of the engineer who was blown up while sweeping the road for mines on Highway 13.Bravo 2/2 Inf was still operating out of Thunder 2.

Curtis Parker
B 2/2 Inf,3rd Platoon, Track B231
9 Dec 1967-10 Dec 1968
John Kerins
Reply with quote  #14 
Actually the fellow blown up that day was Robert Floyd Williams. A spec 4 grunt with the 1st of the 28th. He and some others were attached to the 1st plt for the sweep. He was well off the road. About 75 meters to the East. Last man on that side of the sweep. Lt Stafford believes he tripped an old anti vehicle mine that was laid by the Viet Minh. The were the remains of an French installation very near where the mine was laid. Way to big for anti-personal. Probably the trip device had rotted after over a decade in the jungle. And that allowed the weight of a man to set it off   

It bothered me for years that I didn't know his name. Finally tracked it down. Still there is a guy, a brand new mechanic who was blown of my track on 9 Jan 69. So new that none of us remembered his name. He was torn up pretty good, SFC Jones and I pulled him off Hwy 13 and got him to the collection point. Don't know his name of if he lived or not.

That still bothers me.
BCC
Reply with quote  #15 
John,
According to the "Virtual Wall"  http://www.virtualwall.org/u-army/2ndinfrgt.htm  there were no 2d Inf KIAs on 9 Jan 69.  You might check this list to see if anything rings a bell in the following days.
Curtis Parker
Reply with quote  #16 
John as I remember there were remnants of an old French Installation with old rusted barbwire on the West Side of Highway 13 just Off the road between Thunder 1 and Thunder 2. We swept that area so many times to open the road for convoys during road Security,.Was the Soldier from the 1/28th Inf a newbe in country?... when it is your time it's your time to pay the price of Combat in the NAM!!! Curtis Parker B 2/2 Inf, 3rd Plt, Track B231 9 Dec 1967-10 Dec 1968
John Kerins
Reply with quote  #17 
Curtis,

Re 9 Jan 69, I checked that too. But he was torn up pretty good. He may have died in hospital out of country. If he did I don't think he'd be on the Wall. Also not sure if the company would have been informed. Hope he made it, but still feel bad about not knowing.

The mine on 14 April 68 was East of 13. Seems there was a French installation there also. According to his profile on the virtual wall, Williams had put in about 10 months.  I think Bau Bang might have been a good size hamlet. So maybe over time the French may have had several positions around it. Also this was just on line with the new rainy season Thunder I, so a bit south of the old Thunder I.

Definitely when it's your time, it's your time. But it's ironic that he was killed by guys fighting someone else, and who probably never heard of the US. And that guy may have been dead for years before Williams died
Curtis Parker
Reply with quote  #18 
John you are right that it is ironic that a Soldier gets killed from another Army and war from a previous time....ones destiny is Not often in a individuals hands of control.Have a nice day!!!


Curtis

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